How to identify abnormal vaginal discharge

vagina infectionThe vagina environment maintains a perfect balance of normal bacteria and yeast and any change in the vaginal environment affects the color, texture and smell of the discharge. Vaginal discharge is most often a normal and regular occurrence. However, there are certain types of discharge that can indicate an infection. Abnormal discharge may be yellow or green, chunky in consistency, or have a foul odor. Abnormal discharge is usually caused by yeast or bacterial infection.

The cause of thick, white or cheesy vaginal discharge with foul smell is a sign of yeast infection mainly caused due to thrush or vaginitis. Other manifestation of abnormal vaginal discharge that may or may not be associated with pain and itching, they include:


• Thick and curdy white vaginal discharge: It is likely to be caused due to a fungal infection called candidiasis. It may cause irritation but no foul smell.
• Frothy, yellowish or greenish vaginal discharge: This when present with a bad smell can be due to trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by a parasite.
• White, grey or yellow color vaginal discharge: It is mainly caused due to bacterial vaginosis and may result in fishy odor.vaginal inf.

• White vaginal discharge with smell: This can be caused due to excessive use of antibiotics or steroids, birth control pills, pelvic inflammatory disease, sexually transmitted infections like chlamydia or gonorrhea, diabetes and in rare cases endometrial or cervical cancer. In certain cases, itching and pain in and around the vagina is present.
To confirm the cause of abnormal discharge, you’ll have to visit your gynecologist.

You can also get confidential, accurate and non-judgmental counseling on issues relating to your sexual and reproductive health from our trained counselors on the My Question service by sending an sms to 38120 from your MTN, Airtel, Glo and Starcomms FREE of charge. Just remember to include your AGE, SEX and LOCATION. You can also call to speak to our counselors FREE on Airtel only from Mon – Fri, 9am – 5pm. The number is 08027192781.

Breast Issues

So iv been learning alot from YouthPulse and i urge you guys to joint the forum just click here  http://www.youthpulse.org and sign up

Some women feel unhappy about their breasts’ size. They wish they were bigger or smaller or firmer. The size or shape of your breasts has nothing to do with their sensitivity: small breasts are just as sensitive as big ones. Your breasts – their shape and size – are determined by your genes. The shape is also influenced by the surrounding muscles.
breastsizeYou may notice your breasts get bigger or smaller if you put on or lose weight. The size of your breasts can depend on the time of the month, and may also be affected by hormonal contraceptive
Can I make my breasts grow bigger?
There is no proof that any exercises can make your breasts grow bigger, and certainly no proof that creams or sprays can do it. The only possibility is plastic surgery – you can have your breasts enlarged artificially, however there could be some side effects to this procedure.

It is always good to appreciate your body and be proud of who you are, because you are unique! Therefore there is really no need to be ashamed of any part of your body to make you want to increase or decrease it.

You can also get confidential, accurate and non-judgmental counseling on issues relating to your sexual and reproductive health from our trained counselors on the My Question service by sending an sms to 38120 from your MTN, Airtel, Glo and Starcomms FREE of charge. Just remember to include your AGE, SEX and LOCATION. You can also call to speak to our counselors FREE on Airtel only from Mon – Fri, 9am – 5pm. The number is 08027192781

How much do you know about HPV

hpv           It’s the most common sexually transmitted infection and causes cancer, but what do you really know about HPV, the human papilloma virus?

We talk a lot about Chlamydia, gonorrhea and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). Unfortunately, we’re not talking a lot about HPV.

Men are most often asymptomatic if they have an HPV infection, and they usually only find out about an infection after a partner has tested positive and informed them. Women, on the other hand, may have symptoms including genital warts.       hpv_billboard_web-300x143.jpg        Vaccinations Crucial for Both Sexes

We have the ability to decrease the incidence of these cancers by vaccinating children and young adults prior to their being exposed to the HPV virus. It is critical that we vaccinate both boys and girls to help prevent them from having to deal with a devastating cancer diagnosis.

The majority of those exposed to the virus successfully fends it off and don’t develop cancer, but not everyone is so lucky. HPV does not discriminate against age, race, rich or poor, men or women.

Vaccine May Be Given Up to Age 27

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children receive three doses of the HPV vaccine by the time they become sexually active.

The vaccines are generally recommended for children age 11 to 12,
but what if you’ve reached adulthood and haven’t yet received them?
You may be eligible to receive the series of vaccinations up until 27 years of age!

Timetable for Pap Tests       hpv_badge-300x300.png

Pap tests, the most common form of cervical cancer screening, are done as part of women’s gynecological care.

  • A woman should have her first Pap test when she is 21.
  • A pap smear, the screening test for cervical cancer, should be done every three years in women ages 21 to 29.
  • After age 30, women need to have the pap smear only every three to five years, but co-testing a pap smear along with a specialized HPV test is suggested.
  • All patients should have an annual gynecological exam—including a visual inspection of the cervix—and a pelvic exam yearly.
  • There are a few different screening algorithms for cervical cancer. The ideal option is a Pap test with an HPV test every 5 years. An alternate approach is a screening pap every 3 years.

Depending on how the results come back, women may need additional testing or more frequent screening. If testing is normal they may continue on the same pap test schedule.

By Louise Donahue for Summit Medical Group

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